Gas Spring

Gas Spring

Opening up a car’s hood while working on the engine can be difficult without having the proper tool or aid. Situating a comfortable, level interior chair or holding open a heavy door can also be difficult without some assistance. A gas spring serves well in these tasks. Gas Springs are comprised of a sturdy chamber (also know as pneumatic chamber) that stores pressurized nitrogen gas and oil. This pneumatic chamber is sealed at the bottom to contain the nitrogen and oil, the seal also allows for pressure ranging from 10 pounds up to 450 pounds (sometimes even more) of potential energy to be stored in the spring. An important of a gas spring is the piston rod, which is well lubricated to be able to slide in and out, compressing the gas, giving the spring its extended and compressed length. The gas allows the spring to store energy, while the oil damps (slows and smooths) the movement of the piston and also provides lubrication.

 

When compared to mechanical springs, gas springs are able to generate a larger force and longer stroke, especially in relation to their size and weight. A Gas Spring can be adjusted at any given time to suit different conditions or requirements simply by increasing or decreasing the gas pressure in the pneumatic chamber. This is a valuable feature for vehicles with high load variation that run on varying terrains and in big differences in ambient temperature.

 

Gas springs have many different applications. In the automotive industry they are used and installed as opening aids for tailgates, trunk lids and hoods. They control the opening behavior and can be used wherever a functionally reliable and convenient operation requiring minor effort is expected. Because of the flexible adjustment of the forces for constant dimensions and of their flat characteristics gas springs are the ideal opening aid. 

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