Shock Absorbers

Shock Absorbers

Shock absorbers provide invaluable stability to the vehicle when traveling over rough terrain, keeping your ride as smooth as possible. They allow your car to withstand the jostling and bumping that occurs during road travel by transferring that weight throughout it, ensuring that it is dispersed properly and protecting your car´s performance.  Shock Absorbers consist of a cylinder called the reserve tube that is filled with hydraulic fluid (oil), another tube called the pressure cylinder within that cylinder, a piston that travels through the inner cylinder, and valve that regulate the flow of fluid from one side of the piston to the other as bumps in the road are encountered. They are attached to your vehicle using bolts and rubber bushings.

 

Shock absorbers are hydraulic devices that help to minimize the impact and rebound movement of your vehicle's springs and suspension. Along with smoothening out bumps and vibrations, the key role of the shock absorber is to ensure that the vehicle’s tires remain in contact with the road surface at all times.  At rest or in motion, the bottom surface of your tires is the only part of your vehicle in contact with the road. Any time that a tire’s contact with the ground is broken or reduced; your ability to drive, steer and brake is severely compromised.

 

Properly functioning car shock absorbers play a critically important role in your vehicle’s handling and stopping distance. However, due to their impact-absorbing function, they are prone to wear over time, and thus, need to be replaced typically around every 50,000 miles. Damaged or worn out shock absorbers also increase wear on other suspension parts and can result in uneven and increased tire wear.

 

While it may be somewhat difficult to know exactly when it’s time for a shock absorber replacement, there are several indications that a shock absorber is nearing or has already passed the end of its service life. If fluid is leaking from them, it’s time to start thinking about replacing them. A quick test to inspect your shock absorber conditions consists of pressing down with all your weight on one corner of the vehicle, trying to make it bounce. If the vehicle continues moving up and down after you press down and let go, your shock absorbers may be worn out and it may be time to have them replaced.

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